Lincoln Avenue in 1870: What did women do all day?

See all the topics about Lincoln Avenue in the 1870’s and 1880’s. We have been looking at the Census data from 1870 and 1880 to understand the people who lived on what became Lincoln Avenue in 1877. In 1870, the primary occupation listed for both the Black majority and the white minority of both women[…]

Jennie Jackson DeHart and the Fisk Jubilee Singers

Jennie Jackson sang in the original Fish Jubilee Singers beginning in 1871. In 1885 she married the Nashville preacher Andrew J. DeHart, and the couple promptly returned to DeHart’s hometown of Cincinnati. Jennie Jackson Dehart continued her concert career with variations on the Jubilee Singers as her husband took over as principal at the Colored[…]

Major Savings and Loan

Major Savings and Loan, located primarily at Gilbert and Lincoln Avenues, was the longest-lived African American Savings and Loan in Cincinnati, operating from 1921 until 1986. Savings and Loans, earlier called Building and Loans, were the primary savings institutions for most people, and the source of most mortgage loans, during the middle half of the[…]

Dr. Loretta C. Manggrum

Loretta Cessor, born in 1896 in Gallipolis, Ohio, had African American, Irish and Native American ancestry. Her mother was a teacher who played the piano and the guitar. Loretta proved a natural pianist, playing in her Sunday School from the age of six, and in her church while still a child. At about 15 she[…]

Ida Mae Rhodes

Ida Mae Rhodes was born in 1899 and lived until 2000 – 101 years. She went to the University of Cincinnati; most records show her graduating in 1919. Yet the university bulletin for 1919-1920 shows her as a junior, and in 1920 she became the president of the first African American sorority on the campus.[…]

Sarah Gibson Jones

Many African Americans in Cincinnati before the Civil War arrived responsible for their own freedom. Many had found ways as enslaved people to purchase their own freedom. Many more arrived when Black family members or friends purchased their freedom for them. Still others were descended from free people in the North. But there were always[…]

Eleanora Alms and her legacy

Eleanora Alms survived her husband Frederick by more than 20 years. She stepped in to the role of a leading philanthropist, lavishly memorializing her late husband, but also imprinting her own cultural tastes for art and design on the city of Cincinnati. As mentioned in the previous post, in 1902 Eleanora Alms donated the enormous[…]

Dow Drugs

The late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries saw an explosion of consumer products, and produced a revolution in retail sales. Where were the new economic actors going to buy and sell all that stuff? Drug stores stepped into the breach, expanding from pharmaceutical products and hard candy to a plethora of new products, including bathing[…]

Dr. Lucy Oxley

Dr. Lucy Oxley, the first African American woman to earn an MD from the University of Cincinnati medical school (1935), ran her practice in Walnut Hills. She helped to found what became the Academy of Family Physicians in 1947-48 and served on the Ohio State Board of Medical Examiners beginning in 1980, and was named[…]