Lincoln Avenue in 1870: What did women do all day?

See all the topics about Lincoln Avenue in the 1870’s and 1880’s. We have been looking at the Census data from 1870 and 1880 to understand the people who lived on what became Lincoln Avenue in 1877. In 1870, the primary occupation listed for both the Black majority and the white minority of both women[…]

Lincoln Avenue in 1870: What did men do all day?

We have been looking at the Census data from 1870 and 1880 to understand the people who lived on what became Lincoln Avenue in 1877. The last post looked at women in 1870; this one will look at men. The most striking gender difference comes in the variety of occupations assigned by the census taker[…]

Scene near Walnut Hills: Abraham Lincoln Monument 1967

Our previous post looked at the Abraham Lincoln monument in Avondale, both today and when it was constructed in 1902. The most famous incident at the monument in living memory came in the summer of 1967, beginning on June 11. The site was the center of the revolt or civil unrest on the part of[…]

Scene near Walnut Hills: Abraham Lincoln Monument

Venturing on a walk from Walnut Hills to our neighbors in Avondale, I passed the Abraham Lincoln Memorial at the corner of Rockdale and Reading, outside South Avondale School. The scene was colorful, solemn, appropriate, and extremely moving to me. A monument and a corner that has seen much controversy over the years, it has[…]

Baseball Venues in Walnut Hills

Click here to see more information about Black Baseball in Walnut Hills The Deer Creek Commons, built over a large culvert down the valley between Gilbert Avenue and Reading Road, included the greatest amateur baseball venue in Cincinnati during the first half of the twentieth century. Deer Creek Commons was the home field for the[…]

Baseball Venues: Walnut Hills Ashland Park

Click here to see more information about Black Baseball in Walnut Hills The parks plans of the progressive era not only resulted in the construction of large facilities like the Deer Creek Commons considered in the last post; Cincinnati also set about building a number of small neighborhood parks. In 1911 the new Park Board[…]

Jennie Jackson DeHart and the Fisk Jubilee Singers

Jennie Jackson sang in the original Fish Jubilee Singers beginning in 1871. In 1885 she married the Nashville preacher Andrew J. DeHart, and the couple promptly returned to DeHart’s hometown of Cincinnati. Jennie Jackson Dehart continued her concert career with variations on the Jubilee Singers as her husband took over as principal at the Colored[…]

DeHart Hubbard and Baseball in Cincinnati

Click here to see more information about Black Baseball in Walnut Hills William DeHart Hubbard was born in Walnut Hills in 1903, named after the well-respected principal A. J. DeHart at the segregated Frederick Douglass School in the neighborhood. Hubbard went on to the original Walnut Hills High School at Ashland and Burdette, just three[…]