Lincoln Avenue in 1870: What did women do all day?

See all the topics about Lincoln Avenue in the 1870’s and 1880’s. We have been looking at the Census data from 1870 and 1880 to understand the people who lived on what became Lincoln Avenue in 1877. In 1870, the primary occupation listed for both the Black majority and the white minority of both women[…]

Residents of Lincoln Avenue, 1870-1880: Where did they come from?

See all the topics about Lincoln Avenue in the 1870’s and 1880’s. We have seen that in 1870 the Black majority and the white residents on what would become Lincoln Avenue had comparable real estate investments. These groups had something else in common: most families had migrated to Cincinnati. More than 50% of the white[…]

Lincoln Avenue in 1870: What did men do all day?

We have been looking at the Census data from 1870 and 1880 to understand the people who lived on what became Lincoln Avenue in 1877. The last post looked at women in 1870; this one will look at men. The most striking gender difference comes in the variety of occupations assigned by the census taker[…]

Lincoln Avenue in the 1870’s and 1880’s

From early in Walnut Hills history, Lincoln Avenue was at the heart of a vibrant, diverse community. Using the 1870 and 1880 census along with other sources, we can learn about the people who lived there, how they compared to others in Walnut Hills, and how that area developed in the period from the Civil[…]

Lincoln Avenue at the Beginning, a majority African American Community

See all the topics about Lincoln Avenue in the 1870’s and 1880’s. The beginnings of Lincoln Avenue in Walnut Hills came officially in 1877, when the tree names for streets in the newly absorbed hilltop suburb caused sufficient confusion with the tree names for streets in the Cincinnati basin to warrant something new. The blocks,[…]

Demographics – “Blue-Lining”

In 1932, Curtis Publishing released a marketing study based on what we would now call a “mashup” of circulation data for the popular Ladies’ Home Journal and Saturday Evening Post magazines, assorted items of market research, and 1930 census data. This early depression era exercise in what Mark Twain had dubbed “lies, damned lies, and[…]